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Trinidad are you ready?

This week’s gorgeous naturalista with the breathtaking locs hails from the Land of the Humming Bird, but I will let her introduce herself.

SK: State your name and country of birth:

Amanda: Amanda T. Mc Intyre… Trinidad

Photographer: Steve Hernandez

Photographer: Steve Hernandez

Age: 33 years old

How long have you been natural or transitioning? I went natural at 17.

Why did you decided to go natural? My hair was salon treated with relaxers for a short while years ago and I felt so far removed from what it was and showed little care for it. One day I was at home and this young woman from my neighbourhood came over. She was tall with very dark beautiful skin. She looked at me and was alarmed by how poorly my hair was kept. In spite of this disapproval I felt greatly charmed by her. She convinced me to leave with her. We went to her house. I sat on the edge of her bed and while she talked she kept running her fingers through my hair. I remember nothing of what she said, but I have a clear sensual memory about the feel of her fingers moving slowly and softly on me, of the tonal quality of her voice, the scent of her body coming so close to my face, of her clothing every so often brushing against my cheeks and of her legs touching mine. She started cutting and I did not object. I was bewitched by her everything. When she was done she held up a mirror to me and I saw a new self.

SK: Fitting quote, I think.

SK: Fitting quote, I think.

SK: How easy or difficult was it in the beginning stages when you chopped or started your transition? It was incredibly easy for me to move from one phase to the next. My aunt Christine was very involved in caring for my hair. In the early years, she would sit with me on Sundays and clean it one lock at a time. She would also palm roll my hair using Indian hemp and oils.

Photographer: Steve Hernandez

Photographer: Steve Hernandez

SK: What is your hair regimen? I have no fixed regimen. I wash and moisturize whenever I feel like it. I love styling it. Each morning I sit at my mirror and prepare it for the day. I love wearing accessories in my hair. I have a drawer filled with flowers and fascinators. The whole process of caring for it is very romantic to me. My hair knows that I think it is beautiful and therefore it responds beautifully to me; just like a lover would.

SK: Name your favourite products? Coconut Oil and Indian Hemp are my two favourite hair care products.

SK: How easy or difficult is it sourcing products that you love to use on your hair where you live of reside? Products are readily available in Trinidad. There are specialty stores and a multitude of local artisans that provide wonderfully made natural products. There are also generic items available at cosmetic counters, supermarkets and drug stores.

SK: Favourite Style: I don’t have a favourite style. I am always satisfied with my hair. I love experimenting. I am never daunted at the thought of trying something new. (SK: What a great view to have)

Photographer: Steve Hernandez

Photographer: Steve Hernandez

SK: What’s a great hair day or a bad hair day to you? Clean and moisturized is a good day, and therefore every day is good.

SK: Who’s your hair crush? My hair crush is Lisa Bonet. Ever since I was in primary school I have adored her locks and that adoration remained throughout the years and is just as strong today.

SK: What would you say to employers and teachers who think that natural hair is not for the office or the classroom? I would remind them that hair is a signifier of blackness and it would be remiss to deny a person this expression of racial identification.

SK: Describe your hair in one word and say why? I would use the word ‘myth’ to describe my hair since it is an essential part of the myth I am creating about myself. It is steeped in my life’s energy. It is my story that begins in this way:

          

Photographer: Steve Hernandez

Photographer: Steve Hernandez

Once upon a time in Belmont, there was a writer with magic. She was very grateful to the benevolent Universe for the creative energy that was invested in her. At the end of her stories she would thank the great spirits that courted her. At the sound of her voice, the moon would lift its evening sky veil to reveal the first quarter of its holy face and say, “Well done Rasta Empress!” The magical writer would, at this luminous salutation, let down her dread hair and respond, “Well shone Rasta moon!”

(SK: *loud applause* As a journalist I was blown away by this writer’s way with words. *hats off* to Amanda!)

SK: Name something outrageous or edgy or just different that you would like to try? I would like to experiment with shades of blue and grey. Perhaps, I’ll do this when I am forty years old. I look forward to that age. New colours may be a good way to celebrate. (SK: I am always for a hair change to mark a milestone, so I am all for this thought!)

SK: By the way, in these photos, Amanda was wearing one of her favourite outfits, “It was a present from my friend Stephanie Lietch. These images were taken at an art exhibition I attended last weekend; Kenwyn  Murray’s, ‘Portrait of an Angel’.”

The photographer is Steve Hernandez.

The photographer is Steve Hernandez.

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Best wishes as your journey continues Amanda! 

Ciao!

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